Understanding Quilt PatternsThis is a featured page

Quilt Pattern













As you can see from the picture above, a traditional quilt design is divided into squares or quilt blocks as they are called. In this quilt all the blocks are identical; they are examples of the same quilt pattern. A quilt that includes a variety of different quilt blocks is called a sampler quilt.

Quilt patterns have such interesting names: Bear Paw, Flying Geese, Attic Window, Tumbling Blocks, Wedding Ring, Log Cabin, Fence Rail, Pine Tree, Hens and Chicks, and Le Moyne Star. These are just a few of the traditional quilt patterns from our pioneer heritage when quilters reflected the world around them in their artwork. Today’s quilters still enjoy recreating the old patterns in modern fabrics and colors plus working with the latest in intricate patterns.

Studying and learning about quilt patterns is a fascinating hobby in itself. Arts and crafts historians have traced the origins of the various quilt patterns and their symbolic meanings. If you search libraries and booksellers, you will find delightful histories of quilting and quilt patterns. When you use the original quilt patterns, you are proudly preserving an important part of our American heritage and culture.

There are literally hundreds of striking quilt patterns and an endless array of color schemes that change the look of each pattern. The BIG PROBLEM common to all quilting enthusiasts is how to make a quilt from each of the best quilt patterns during their lifetime!

See also
  • Choosing a quilt pattern


QuiltingLovers
QuiltingLovers
Latest page update: made by QuiltingLovers , May 14 2006, 12:47 PM EDT (about this update About This Update QuiltingLovers Edited by QuiltingLovers

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